Glenorie

2008
CC BY-SA 2.0
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Glenorie

Glenorie, in the shire of Hornsby, was originally known as North Dural or Upper Dural. The name was officially changed on 1 October 1894. Earlier that year, two names – Hazeldore and Glenorie – had been suggested by local resident William Black and offered to the postmaster-general, who chose Glenorie. [1]

According to Ruby Ramm in her recollections Life at Lansdale, Glenorie is an Aboriginal name meaning ‘much water’. Indeed, there are many springs in the area, the largest of which was estimated in 1970 to provide 90 million gallons (409 megalitres) of clean water each year. [2] Other sources however, indicate that Glenorie was named after a town in Scotland. [3] The name was first mentioned in 1827.

The suburb stands on land which was part of 34,539 acres (14,000 hectares) reserved by Governor King in 1802, but in 1816 Governor Macquarie declared the area open to settlers.

Timber-getters arrived in about 1817, and as the timber was cleared, farmers moved in. The Great North Road was built through the area from 1825, and the land around Glenorie was parcelled out as land grants. The largest grant was 1,500 acres (607 hectares) to George Acres, and Glenorie grew just north of this grant.

By 1860, orchards were being established. As some were cultivated from seed, families needed to sow quick-bearing crops to provide an income until the trees could bear fruit. It was found that crops such as beans, peas and passionfruit were suitable. When the orchards were well established, a market for mandarins was found in New Zealand. Fruit was sent there until the 1920s. [4]

During the Depression of the 1930s, many tonnes of fruit were dumped or given away. Those orchardists who survived began growing stone fruit, having access to better storage and more water. During World War II, citrus growers had to sell 25 per cent of their lemon and orange crops to the army, so that the juice could be concentrated and dispatched to the forces. [5]

In 1947, a meeting of the Glenorie Progress Association was held with representatives from Hornsby and Baulkham Hill shires, and this resulted in the formation of the Glenorie Volunteer Bushfire Brigade. The brigade is now situated next to the Memorial Hall. The hall, which was officially opened in 1933, was used for films, dances and concerts. Glenorie School of Arts was established in 1902, and the members met in an old wooden school room which became their hall.

A metal and shale quarry operated a little to the northwest of the intersection of Cattai Ridge Road and Abbott Place, and a steam-driven traction engine at times towed up to five or six large wagons of shale and metal. A blacksmith’s forge operated into the 1930s, and a sawmill into the 1960s.

Today Glenorie is a semi-rural area with some hobby farms and allotments averaging two hectares.

The township of Glenorie provides shopping and recreation facilities for the surrounding area.

Notes

[1] Glenorie Public School centenary and district history, 1888–1988: one hundred fruitful years, the school, Glenorie NSW, 1988

[2] Baulkham Hills Shire Council, 'Shire Information', http://www.baulkhamhills.nsw.gov.au/Shire-Information.html

[3] Baulkham Hills Shire Council, 'Origins of Suburb Names', http://www.baulkhamhills.nsw.gov.au/Origins-of-Suburb-Names.html#glenorie

[4] Glenorie Public School centenary and district history, 1888–1988: one hundred fruitful years, the school, Glenorie NSW, 1988, p 98

[5] Glenorie Public School centenary and district history, 1888–1988: one hundred fruitful years, the school, Glenorie NSW, 1988

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