Scarborough

Convict transport ship of 430 tons which formed part of the First and Second fleets. In 1788 it arrived with a crew of 35, 50 marines and 208 male convicts.

Milestone
Constructed
Scarborough, England
1782
Arrived Sydney
19 Jan 1788
Departed Sydney
06 May 1788
Arrived Sydney
28 Jun 1790
Departed Sydney
08 Aug 1790
Destroyed
Port Royal, Jamaica
1805
Name
Alternate
Scabro
Commemorated by
Position
1787 - 1788
1787 - 1788
1787 - 1788
1787 - 1788
1787 - 1788
1787 - 1788
1787 - 1788
1787 - 1788
1787 - 1788
1787 - 20 May 1787
1787 - 20 May 1787
1787 - 1788
1787 - 20 Mar 1787
1790
1790
1790
1790
1790
1790
1790
1790
Apr 1790 - 28 Jun 1790
Apr 1790 - 28 Jun 1790
Apr 1790 - 28 Jun 1790
Relationship
Included in
Included in
Type

First Fleet

CC BY-SA 2.0
,
2015

Phillip described the transportation of convicts to New South Wales as a voyage 'to the extremity of the globe'. Having successfully managed both the ships and the convicts, the arrival of the First Fleet at Sydney Cove brought Phillip new challenges: how to keep men and women, convicts and alcohol, camp and fleet, apart.

Scarborough

CC BY-SA 2.0
,
2015

The second largest of the First Fleet vessels, Scarborough carried male convicts to the penal colony of New South Wales as part of both the First and Second fleets. Scarborough was the only ship of the First Fleet whose convict passengers plotted a mutiny, albeit one that was swiftly uncovered and thwarted

Scarborough: Second Fleet

CC BY-SA 2.0
,
2016

Scarborough sailed with the First and the Second Fleet and experienced an attempted mutiny both times. Charted by slave traders along with Neptune and Surprize, the Scarborough became part of the notorious 'death fleet', with around 73 of over 250 convicts dying on board and many hospitalised on arrival.