Ultimo Presbyterian Church Roll of Honour

Wooden board featuring three panels which include the names of 36 men who enlisted in the AIF during World War I. Initiated by Reverend John Muir in 1916 it originally listed 19 names and was placed in the Ultimo Presbyterian Church where it stayed until the church fell into disuse. The board was installed in the entrance to the Ultimo Community Centre in March 2015.

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1916
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Occupied
30 Jul 1916 - 2015
Occupied
16 Mar 2015 -
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Returned Soldiers on the Ultimo Presbyterian Church Roll of Honour

CC BY-SA 2.0
,
2015

The Ultimo Presbyterian Church Roll of Honour, now housed in the Ultimo Community Centre, lists the names of 36 men who served in World War I. We can only be sure 22 came home but their stories reveal the hardships of war service, larrikin behaviour, heroism and injuries that must have been a terrible burden to returned soldiers.

The Fallen on the Ultimo Presbyterian Church Roll of Honour

CC BY-SA 2.0
,
2015

The Ultimo Presbyterian Church Roll of Honour, now housed in the Ultimo Community Centre, lists the names of 36 men. Four of those men died as a result of their war service and were lost to their families and friends - people who openly grieved their passing. Their grief is a reminder of the true cost of war, for the fallen and for their family, friends, and community.

Ultimo Presbyterian Church Roll of Honour

CC BY-SA 2.0
,
2015

The roll of honour from the former Ultimo Presbyterian Church, now located in the Ultimo Community Centre, lists 36 men associated with the Ultimo community who served in the First Australian Imperial Forces in World War I. The board, instigated in 1916 shortly after the arrival of Reverend John Muir, is part of a tradition in which honour rolls were used to memorialise, mobilise, recruit and mourn.